still frame / still life – october 1, 2013

They've grown so much.

They’ve grown so much.

October is quickly coming to an end and snow has been threatening to arrive any day.

But, on Tuesday, October 1 we weren’t worrying about snow quite yet. We were celebrating yurt developments – lights!

Joel installs our lights in the yurt.

Joel installs our lights in the yurt.

October 1st was a home day for us to do chores and errands.

To town

To town

Honey, woodworking, and tending the animals.

Honey, woodworking, and tending the animals.

Joel was also featured in the Hanley news:

Hanley News

 

This is the 4th year anniversary of Still frame /Still life. Let’s flash back:

Last year – October 1, 2012 – We were travelling to Winnipeg in beautiful fall weather

October 1, 2011 – In South Sudan we were on a parish visit hanging out with Koreans

October 1, 2010 – Was an average Sudan day with teaching and office work.

still frame / still life – september 1, 2013

Sunday, September 1 was a beautiful, sunny, still-summery (albeit with autumny leaves in the background) day. We found a cup we had bought in Japan in 2009 and had NEVER USED! Who packs up a mug for 4 years? Apparently us.

Sept 1 breakfast

People in our church community have definitely invested themselves in our yurt adventure. Either by helping with the set up, giving us building advice, bringing over guests to visit, or simply seeking out yurts on their holidays to take pictures of then bring them home for us. “See, you aren’t the only strange ones out there. They have yurts in America too!”

Sept1church

Can you figure out what Joel is doing in the above picture? He is spreading out food to dry in the sun. Sort of like we would see in Korea and Sudan during harvest time.

Remember the sunflowers from August 1st? They’ve grown.

Sept1gardencomparison

Our yurt is in transition. We are unpacking kitchen boxes we haven’t used since 2006, prepping for winter with window installations and a stove, building a “bathroom”, we are processing food, and brewing meed, we are settling in – which always looks a bit messy and crazy right before you are actually settled.

Sept1yurtIn the afternoon we went to the wedding of Joel’s band mate. It was nice. And in between wedding and reception we shopped and ate chinese food.

Sept1afternoonThe reception:

Sept1evening

July was cold and August has been hot and dry. Our garden hasn’t been as successful as last year but it is only partly due to the weather. It is also about not having great time management over these summer months. It is about having a yurty distraction. And perhaps even about taking some vacation days during the wrong weeks. But finally finally we are starting to see some almost ripe tomatoes (those green ones are green zebra tomatoes. they are riper than they look). And this makes me happy.

029

Still Saskatchewan 2013 – photos added

This summer we have hosted many friends at the home quarter. Goats were fed, chickens were caught, garden peas were eaten, yurt tours were given. It has been great! We also traveled to Manitoba and Ontario for visits, music, and a wedding.

Want to see some pictures? Click on this extremely long link:

https://plus.google.com/photos/107347752874353476675/albums/5866481590552865553?authkey=CJHJj8Sl_svhsgE

Or click on this summer time picture:

Sweet sweet Saskatchewan strawberries

 

Winnipeg Folkfest Roadtrip

(It is a blog-tastic day).

Last weekend we returned from a week of holidays to Manitoba.

Winnipeg friends and familyOur first days in Winnipeg were spent with the family and friends (and a visit to Ikea, for the first time!). The following were spent at the Winnipeg Folkfest.

Folkfest 2013

Favourites at the folkfest were the Milk Carton Kids, Whitehorse, Danny Michel and the Garifuna Collective, a great camp site, and an excellent volunteering experience.

Such a good holiday week.

Washington!

Hey! It’s summer and that means lots of time spent outside enjoying sunshine and growing plants and animals. But today it is Sunday and it is cool and rainy. So, let’s recap over a few blog entries.

At the end of June I had the opportunity to go to Washington for Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience (STAR). This is a training offered through Eastern Mennonite University but held (this time) at the United States Institute for Peace. I went a few days early so I could stuff my face with museums and monuments with about a million other tourists.

Washington

Since I was travelling by myself I had to take pictures of other people in front of some of the monuments.

Washington 2013

The United States Institute for Peace is an impressive building with lots of security people, which did seem a bit strange.

Institute for peace

The STAR training was an amazing experience with a variety of participants (although i was the only Canadian!). It was equally professional development and an amazing time of self-analysis in how trauma has shaped me, especially over the past few years. And, I would recommend this training to everyone, if you have the chance!